Bundanon

The site of Bundanon was first seen by Europeans in 1805 when James Meehan, a surveyor in Government employ, sailed from Port Jackson to the mouth of the Crookhaven River and inspected the Shoalhaven River as far west as the Burrier ford. 

European occupation was established at Bundanon in 1831 through a grant of 600 acres made to Richard Henry Browne for a quit rent (equivalent of a land tax) of four pounds and ten shillings per year. The land grant was conditional on the clearing of 55 acres, which were to be fenced and cultivated within five years. This work was not completed and the property was sold to Dr Kenneth Mackenzie on 19 March 1838. 

Bundanon is regionally important in demonstrating characteristics of nineteenth century pastoral landscapes, their social and working structure and the distinctive way of life experienced in the Shoalhaven River valley during the nineteenth century. The attributes which clearly illustrate this are the location of the house; a range of nineteenth century vernacular buildings; the patterns of land use; and the self-contained nature of the property. 

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Bundanon acknowledges the Wodi Wodi and the Yuin, of the South Coast region, and recognises their continuous connection to culture, community and Country.

In Dharawal the word Bundanon means deep valley.

This website contains names, images and voices of deceased Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

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